Events & Seminars

2016 Dec 05

NT&AG: Michael Temkin (Hebrew University), "Topological transcendence degree"

2:00pm to 3:00pm

Abstract: my talk will be devoted to a basic theory of extensions of complete real-valued fields L/K. Naturally, one says that L is topologically-algebraically generated over K by a subset S if L lies in the completion of the algebraic closure of K(S). One can then define topological analogues of algebraic independence, transcendence degree, etc. These notions behave much more wierd than their algebraic analogues. For example, there exist non-invertible continuous K-endomorphisms of the completed algebraic closure of K(x). In my talk, I will tell which part
2017 Jun 19

NT&AG: Ehud de Shalit (HUJI) "Ordinary foliations on unitary Shimura varieties"

2:00pm to 3:00pm

Abstract: Inseparable morphisms proved to be an important tool for the study of algebraic varieties in characteristic p. In particular, Rudakov-Shafarevitch, Miyaoka and Ekedahl have constructed a dictionary between "height 1" foliations in the tangent bundle and "height 1" purely inseparable quotients of a non-singular variety in characteristic p. In a joint work with Eyal Goren we use this dictionary to study the special fiber S of a unitary Shimura variety of signature (n,m), m < n, at a prime p which is inert in the underlying imaginary quadratic field. We
2016 Feb 22

Combinatorics

Repeats every week every Monday until Sun Feb 28 2016 .
10:30am to 12:30pm

Location: 

B221 Rothberg (CS and Engineering building)
Speaker: Asaf Nachmias (TAU) Title: The connectivity of the uniform spanning forest on planar graphs Abstract: The free uniform spanning forest (FUSF) of an infinite connected graph G is obtained as the weak limit uniformly chosen spanning trees of finite subgraphs of G. It is easy to see that the FUSF is supported on spanning graphs of G with no cycles, but it need not be connected. Indeed, a classical result of Pemantle ('91) asserts that when G=Z^d, the FUSF is almost surely a connected tree if and only if d=1,2,3,4.
2015 Nov 09

Combinatorics seminar

Repeats every week every Monday until Mon Nov 23 2015 .
11:00am to 1:00pm

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

B221 Rothberg (CS and Engineering building)
Speaker: Clara Shikhelman, TAU Title: Many T copies in H-free graphs. Abstract: For two graphs T and H and for an integer n, let ex(n,T,H) denote the maximum possible number of copies of T in an H-free graph on n vertices. The study of this function when T=K_2 (a single edge) is the main subject of extremal graph theory. We investigate the general function, focusing on the cases of triangles, complete graphs and trees. In this talk the main results will be presented as will sketches of proofs of some of the following: (i) ex(n,K_3,C_5) < (1+o(1)) (\sqrt 3)/2 n^{3/2}.
2015 Nov 19

Special Combinatorics seminar: Horst Martini (TU Chemnitz, Germany), "Discrete Geometry in Minkowski Spaces"

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Rothberg B314
Title: Discrete Geometry in Minkowski Spaces Abstract: In recent decades, many papers appeared in which typical problems of Discrete Geometry are investigated, but referring to the more general setting of finite dimensional real Banach spaces (i.e., to Minkowski Geometry). In several cases such problems are investigated in the even more general context of spaces with so-called asymmetric norms (gauges). In many cases the extension of basic geometric notions, needed for posing these problems in non-Euclidean Banach spaces, is already interesting enough.
2016 Dec 12

Combinatorics: Zur Luria (ETH)

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

B220 Rothberg (CS)
Speaker: Zur Luria (ETH) Title: Hamiltonian spheres in random hypergraphs Abstract: Hamiltonian cycles are a fundamental object in graph theory, and combinatorics in general. A classical result states that in the random graph model G(n,p), there is a sharp threshold for the appearance of a Hamiltonian cycle. It is natural to wonder what happens in higher dimensions - that is, in random uniform hypergraphs?
2017 Nov 06

Combinatorics seminar: Eric Babson

11:00am to 12:30pm

Location: 

130 at the IIAS
Title: Gaussian Random Links Abstract: A model for random links is obtained by fixing an initial curve in some n-dimensional Euclidean space and projecting the curve on to random 3 dimensional subspaces. By varying the curve we obtain different models of random knots, and we will study how the second moment of the average crossing number change as a function of the initial curve. This is based on work of Christopher Westenberger.
2017 Feb 27

Combinatorics: Thilo Weinert (BGU) "The Ramsey Theory of ordinals and its relation to finitary combinatorics"

10:30am to 12:30pm

Location: 

Rothberg B220 (CS bldg)
Speaker: Thilo Weinert, BGU Title: The Ramsey Theory of ordinals and its relation to finitary combinatorics Abstract: Ramsey Theory is a branch of mathematics which is often times summed up by the slogan “complete disorder is impossible”. An important branch of finitary Ramsey Theory lies in the determination of Ramsey Numbers. Infinitary Ramsey Theory on the other hand is an important branch of set theory. Whereas the Ramsey Theory of the Uncountable often times features independence phenomena, the Ramsey Theory of the Countably Infinite provides many interesting combinatorial challenges.
2017 Jun 18

Combinatorics: Ehud Fridgut (Weizmann Institute) "Almost-intersecting families are almost intersecting-families."

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Rothberg B221 (CS building)
Speaker: Ehud Fridgut (Weizmann Institute) Title: Almost-intersecting families are almost intersecting-families. Abstract: Consider a family of subsets of size k from a ground set of size n (with k < n/2). Assume most (in some well defined sense) pairs of sets in the family intersect. Is it then possible to remove few (in some well defined sense) sets, and remain with a family where every two sets intersect? We will answer this affirmatively, and the route to the answer will pass through a removal lemma in product graphs.

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