Eventss

2016 Dec 27

Special logic seminar - Itaï BEN YAACOV, "Baby version of the asymptotic volume estimate"

10:00am to 12:00pm

Location: 

Shprinzak 102
I'll show how the Vandermonde determinant identity allows us to estimate the volume of certain spaces of polynomials in one variable (or rather, of homogeneous polynomials in two variables), as the degree goes to infinity. I'll explain what this is good for in the context of globally valued fields, and, given time constraints, may give some indications on the approach for the "real inequality" in higher projective dimension.
2018 Jun 13

Logic Seminar - Nick Ramsey - "Keisler measures in simple theories"

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Ross 63
Keisler measures were introduced in the late 80's by Keisler but they became central objects in model theory only recently with the development of NIP theories. This led naturally to the question of whether there might be a parallel theory of measures in other tame classes, especially in the simple theories where pseudofinite counting measures supply natural and interesting examples. We will describe some first steps toward establishing such a theory, based on Keisler randomizations and the theory of independence for NSOP1 theories in continuous logic.
2017 Jun 28

Logic seminar - Shimon Garti, "Tiltan"

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Ross 70
We shall try to prove some surprising (and hopefully, correct) theorems about the relationship between the club principle (Hebrew: tiltan) and the splitting number, with respect to the classical s at omega and the generalized s at supercompact cardinals.
2016 Dec 28

Logic seminar - Matthew Foreman, "Better lucky than smart: realizing a quasi-generic class of measure preserving transformations as diffeomorphisms"

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Ross 70
Better lucky than smart: realizing a quasi-generic class of measure preserving transformations as diffeomorphisms. Speaker: Matthew Foreman Abstract: In 1932, von Neumann proposed classifying measure preserving diffeomorphisms up to measure isomorphism. Joint work with B. Weiss shows this is impossible in the sense that the corresponding equivalence relation is not Borel; hence impossible to capture using countable methods.
2017 Nov 08

Logic Seminar- Itai Ben Yaacov - "Reconstruction for non-aleph0-categorical theories?"

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Math 209
It is a familiar fact (sometimes attributed to Ahlbrandt-Ziegler, though it is possibly older) that two aleph0-categorical theories are bi-interpretable if and only if their countable models have isomorphic topological isomorphism groups. Conversely, groups arising in this manner can be given an abstract characterisation, and a countable model of the theory (up to bi-interpretation, of course) can be reconstructed.
2018 Jan 10

Logic Seminar - Alex Lubotzky - "First order rigidity of high-rank arithmetic groups"

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Ross 63
The family of high rank arithmetic groups is a class of groups playing an important role in various areas of mathematics. It includes SL(n,Z), for n>2 , SL(n, Z[1/p] ) for n>1, their finite index subgroups and many more. A number of remarkable results about them have been proven including; Mostow rigidity, Margulis Super rigidity and the Quasi-isometric rigidity.
2017 Mar 01

Logic seminar - Yair Hayut, "Weak Prediction Principles"

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Ross 70
Weak Prediction Principles Speaker: Yair Hayut Abstract: Jensen's diamond is a well studied prediction principle. It holds in L (and other core models), and in many cases it follows from local instances of GCH. In the talk I will address a weakening of diamond (due to Shaleh and Abraham) and present Abraham's theorem about the equivalence between weak diamond and a weak consequence of GCH. Abraham's argument works for successor cardinals. I will discuss what is known and what is open for inaccessible cardinals. This is a joint work with Shimon Garti and Omer Ben-Neria.
2017 Jul 26

Logic seminar - Andrés Villaveces, "Around non-elementary dependence"

2:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Ross 70
Dependent theories have now a very solid and well-established collection of results and applications. Beyond first order, the development of "dependency" has been rather scarce so far. In addition to the results due to Kaplan, Lavi and Shelah (dependent diagrams and the generic pair conjecture), I will speak on a few lines of current research around the extraction of indiscernibles for dependent diagrams and on various forms on dependence for abstract elementary classes. This is joint work with Saharon Shelah.
2018 May 09

Logic Seminar - Immanuel Benporat - "Arbault sets"

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Ross 63
Arbault sets (briefly, A-sets) were first introduced by Jean Arbault in the context of Fourier analysis. One of his major results concerning these sets,asserts that the union of an A-set with a countable set is again an A-set. The next obvious step is to ask what happens if we replace the word "countable" by א_1. Apparently, an א_1 version of Arbault's theorem is independent of ZFC. The aim of this talk would be to give a proof (as detailed as possible) of this independence result. The main ingredients of the proof are infinite combinatorics and some very basic Fourier analysis.
2017 Dec 13

Logic seminar - Omer Mermelstein - "Template structures for the class of Hrushovski ab initio geometries"

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Math 209
Zilber's trichotomy conjecture, in modern formulation, distinguishes three flavours of geometries of strongly minimal sets --- disintegrated/trivial, modular, and the geometry of an ACF. Each of these three flavours has a classic ``template'' --- a set with no structure, a projective space over a prime field, and an algebraically closed field, respectively. The class of ab initio constructions with which Hrushovski refuted the conjecture features a new flavour of geometries --- non-modular, yet prohibiting any algebraic structure.
2017 May 29

Logic seminar - Ur Yaar, "A Toy Multiverse"

2:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Shprinzak 101
We will present briefly the "multiverse view" of set theory, advocated by Hamkins, that there are a multitude of set-theoretic universes, and not one background universe, and his proposed "Multiverse Axioms". We will then move on to present the main result of Gitman and Hamkins in their paper "A natural model of the multiverse axioms" - that the countable computably saturated models of ZFC form a "toy model" of the multiverse axioms.

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