Eventss

2016 Dec 22

Colloquium: Itai Ben Yaakov (Université Claude Bernard - Lyon 1) "Full globally valued fields"

2:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
The Globally Valued Fields (GVF) project is a joint effort with E. Hrushovski to understand (standard and) non-standard global fields - namely fields in which a certain abstraction of the product formula holds. One possible motivation is to give a model-theoretic framework
for various asymptotic distribution results in global fields.
Formally, a GVF is a field together with a "valuation" in the additive group of an L^1 space, such that the integral of v(a) vanishes for every non-zero a .
2016 May 19

Colloquium: Aner Shalev (Hebrew University) "Probability, growth and complexity in groups"

2:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
I will describe some recent advances in the study of
infinite and finite groups, related to probability,
growth and complexity.
I will start with the celebrated Tits alternative
for linear groups, and present extensions and variations,
including a joint work with Larsen on a probabilistic Tits alternative. This is related to the notion of probabilistic
identities, and related results and open problems will be
mentioned.
I will then discuss approximate subgroups, an important
result by Breuillard-Green-Tao and Pyber-Szabo, and
2016 Dec 08

Colloquium: Gordon Slade (UBC) "Critical phenomena in statistical mechanics"

2:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
The subject of phase transitions and critical phenomena in statistical mechanics is a rich source of interesting and difficult mathematical problems. There has been considerable success in solving such problems for systems in spatial dimension 2, or in high dimensions, but not in dimension 3. This lecture is intended to provide an introduction to recent work that employs a renormalisation group method to study spin systems and self-avoiding walk in dimension 4 (joint with Bauerschmidt and Brydges), as well as long-range versions of these models in dimensions 1,2,3 via an "epsilon expansion."
2015 Dec 31

Colloquium : Jasmin Matz, "Distribution of Hecke eigenvalues for GL(n)"

2:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
Abstract:
A classical problem in the theory of automorphic forms is to count the
number of eigenvalues of the Laplacian acting on cuspidal functions on
the quotient of the upper half plane by a lattice R. For R=SL(2,Z) (or a
congruence subgroup thereof) the answer is given by Selberg's Weyl law
while for the higher rank situation it was established by Mueller and
Lindenstrauss-Venkatesh.
Additional to the Laplacian there is another large family of operators,
namely the Hecke operators attached to SL(2,Z). Sarnak proved that the
2016 Apr 07

Colloquium: Lai-Sang Young (Courant) "Measuring Dynamical Complexity"

2:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
I will discuss, for differentiable dynamical systems, three ways to capture dynamical complexity:
hyperbolicity, which measures the sensitivity of dependence on initial conditions.
entropy, which measures the predictability of future dynamical events in the sense of information theory.
the speed of correlation decay or equivalently the rate at which memory is lost.
2016 Nov 24

Colloquium: Dan Freed (University of Texas) "Bordism and topological phases of matter"

2:00pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
Topological ideas have at various times played an important role in condensed matter physics. This year's Nobel Prize recognized the origins of a particular application of great current interest: the classification of phases of a quantum mechanical system. Mathematically, we would like describe them as path components of a moduli space, but that is not rigorously defined as of now. In joint work with Mike Hopkins we apply
stable homotopy theory (Adams spectral sequence) to compute the group of
topological phases of "invertible" systems. We posit a continuum field
2016 Mar 17

Colloquium-Landau Lectures: Ravi Vakil (Stanford) "Cutting and pasting in algebraic geometry, and the motivic zeta function"

3:30pm to 4:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
Given some class of "geometric spaces", we can make a ring as follows.
1. (additive structure) When U is an open subset of such a space X, [X] = [U] + [(X \ U)]
2. (multiplicative structure)} [X x Y] = [X] [Y].
In the algebraic setting, this ring (the "Grothendieck ring of varieties") contains surprising structure, connecting geometry to arithmetic and topology.
2015 Nov 26

Colloquium: Shai Evra (HUJI), "Topological Expanders"

2:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
Title: Topological Expanders.
Abstract:
A classical result of Boros-Furedi (for d=2) and Barany (for d>=2) from the 80's, asserts that given any n points in R^d, there exists a point in R^d which is covered by a constant fraction (independent of n) of all the geometric (=affine) d-simplices defined by the n points. In 2010, Gromov strengthen this result, by allowing to take topological d-simplices as well, i.e. drawing continuous lines between the n points, rather then straight lines and similarly continuous simplices rather than affine.
2016 Dec 29

Colloquium: Jordan Ellenberg (University of Wisconsin) "The cap set problem"

2:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
A very old question in additive number theory is: how large can a subset of Z/NZ be which contains no three-term arithmetic progression? An only slightly younger problem is: how large can a subset of (Z/3Z)^n be which contains no three-term arithmetic progression? The second problem was essentially solved in 2016, by the combined work of a large group of researchers around the world, touched off by a brilliantly simple new idea of Croot, Lev, and Pach.
2016 Mar 03

Colloquium: Sara Tukachinsky (Hebrew University) "Counts of holomorphic disks by means of bounding chains"

3:30pm to 4:30pm

Location: 

Manchester Building (Hall 2), Hebrew University Jerusalem
Over a decade ago, Welschinger defined invariants of real symplectic manifolds of complex dimensions 2 and 3, which count pseudo-holomorphic disks with boundary and interior point constraints. Since then, the problem of extending the definition to higher dimensions has attracted much attention.

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